FoMB and WalkSF Release Monterey Report

A few weeks ago you might have seen our clipboard toting traffic counters at three intersections along Monterey Boulevard recording interactions between drivers and pedestrians.Or you might have taken the time to fill out our survey.

Now that the data is collected and analyzed, the report is here. (pdf) Produced in partnership with Walk San Francisco it  details the existing conditions, reviews preceding SFMTA work, polls neighborhood opinion, and makes recommendations for a better boulevard.

To make Monterey Boulevard safer and make the neighborhood more walkable the report suggests:

  1. Reduce speed limits to 25 mph on Monterey Boulevard.
  2. Create school zones around local schools.
  3. Install automated speed radar detectors and signs along Monterey Boulevard.
  4. Complete the implementation of the Sunnyside Traffic Calming Project’s traffic-calming recommendations.
  5. Install pedestrian-actuated traffic signal in the crosswalk at Detroit Street.
  6. Increase the signal time at Monterey Boulevard and Foerster Street to accommodate the walking pace of seniors and children.
  7. Actively enforce existing traffic laws at intersections where drivers run stop signs and red lights (Baden, Congo, Edna and Foerster).
  8. Replace worn and illegible crosswalk “Yield to Pedestrian” signs.
  9. Coordinate designated school routes and pedestrian safety measures along Monterey Boulevard with the Safe Routes to School program and the Department of Public Health.
  10. Use street improvements to reduce the chance of wrong-way traffic on Edna Street.
  11. Consider a comprehensive urban design alternative for the intersection of Monterey Boulevard and Foerster Street, in coordination with SRTS, the new Safeway and the community.

The Friends of Monterey Boulevard wishes to thank our survey team Shannon Kane, Kelly Kocella, and Jennifer Patankar.  We are also very grateful to Manish Champsee and Elizabeth Stampe of Walk San Francisco, as well as Rosie Dudley and Jeremy Shaw who stayed up into the night putting the report together. Thanks also to Tom Radulovich of Livable City, our fiscal sponsor.

Funding for this program was provided by a grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety through the Business, Transportation, and Housing Agency.

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5 responses to “FoMB and WalkSF Release Monterey Report

  1. What about adding bike lanes?

  2. I was trying to leave a comment but really unsure where to leave it. Can you pass it on for me? We walk to school from Baden to Edna on Monterey. I would really like to see the yellow Yield to Pedestrian signs that are currently on the median divider moved to the midline of the 2 lanes on each side. This is the way they have it in many places ie: san bruno on the entire length of the street that the swim school Petite Balene is located ie: Hillsdale Mall, San Mateo. It is very effective because it is difficult to speed past them and a constant reminder at each crosswalk. They seem to be very effective and the current placement seems to be very ineffective. I see that it is on the list of changes to replace them so perhaps we can move them at that time.

    Thanks for your consideration and for passing this on to the proper people.

    Lori Chaplin
    Olivia’s Mom 2nd grade Sunnyside

  3. @Annie- We were surprised to see the high number of bicycling users of Monterey. The study was mainly focused on pedestrians, mostly those who use the schools but there’s no reason why kids shouldn’t be able to bike safely to school like many of us did in our youth.

    Who else wants bike lanes?

  4. FYI, regarding bike lanes, the MTA is scheduled to stripe them along the connection between Monterey and San Jose Ave. These should go in over the next month or two, along with “sharrows” near Circular.

    They also have “long term” plans for lanes between Genesee and Circular. No word yet on what “long term” means.

  5. Pingback: Walk to School Day: A Reminder That SF Needs to Make Streets Safer for Kids | Streetsblog San Francisco

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